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Hai guise. I need some help.

 

If anyone can find me a great, quiet, heatsink for a (AM3) AMD processor, you'd be really groovy.

 

I REALLY WANT IT TO BE QUIET.

 

Is price an object?

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Hai guise. I need some help.

 

If anyone can find me a great, quiet, heatsink for a (AM3) AMD processor, you'd be really groovy.

 

I REALLY WANT IT TO BE QUIET.

 

Is price an object?

Price is an object.

 

I'm looking for $100 or less. But with a question like that, I'm beckoning bankruptcy.

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Hai guise. I need some help.

 

If anyone can find me a great, quiet, heatsink for a (AM3) AMD processor, you'd be really groovy.

 

I REALLY WANT IT TO BE QUIET.

 

Is price an object?

Price is an object.

 

I'm looking for $100 or less. But with a question like that, I'm beckoning bankruptcy.

 

You can't go wrong with a Corsair liquid cooling setup, then.

 

A Corsair H50 will run you about sixty bucks, and they're pretty nice.  Setup is kind of annoying, though.

A Corsair H60 is just a few bucks more, setup is a bit easier, and it's pretty good.

Then, if you really ant to make the most of that hundred, get the Corsair H100i.  That thing is a beast.  Then again, that's getting into cooling territory, and may be a bit loud for your needs.

 

All-in-all, I'd probably recommend the H50 as the most silent (and affordable) option.  It's a tried and true cooler, that's why they keep it around.  I haven't used any of the coolers myself, but I am looking into eventually getting one of the Corsair ones, so it's not like I haven't done my research.  I may be a bit biased, though, since I prefer liquid over air cooling.  There are probably plenty of good, quiet air cooling setups, but I think liquid offers the best performance, anyway.

 

I'd recommend looking at an installation video for it first, because it can be a pain in the arse to setup if you haven't done it before.

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I've started to look at the H60, and I really like it. Do you know of anyone who has a Corsair heatsink? I really want it to be pretty quiet. 

Thanks, 

 

Cherpmernk.

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I've started to look at the H60, and I really like it. Do you know of anyone who has a Corsair heatsink? I really want it to be pretty quiet. 

Thanks, 

 

Cherpmernk.

Well it depends.

Are you looking for a reliable air cooler or a reliable liquid cooler?

 

 

If you can afford it then sure why not?

Just don't take my word for it.

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I've started to look at the H60, and I really like it. Do you know of anyone who has a Corsair heatsink? I really want it to be pretty quiet. 

Thanks, 

 

Cherpmernk.

 

I guess a major issue is I don't know the amount of clearance in your case, so I can't really recommend any form of air cooling, since most of the good and quiet ones take up a lot of space in there.

 

And no, I actually only have one friend who really knows anything about computers, and he's on stock cooling as well for now.  We built our computers around the same time.

 

I mean, I guess I could recommend something, though.  A good (and popular) air cooler is the Coolermaster Hyper 212 EVO.  It's a pretty good cooler, but the decibel range is kind of crazy.  It can be pretty quiet, but also pretty loud, from what I hear.

 

If you want something really good at cooling, and relatively quiet for air cooling, I'd really recommend the entire brand, Noctua.  They make SUCH good fans, it's just insane.  Like, really freaking good fans.  If I could afford it, I'd put like four of these in my case, and keep that shiz ice cold.  A really popular CPU cooler by them is the NH-D14.  It's out of stock on Newegg as of the time I post this, though, so I don't know if that'll work out for you.  That's a good example of a good CPU air cooler that is more quiet than a liquid cooling setup.  But it will cost you more as a result.

 

Remember, though, if you really want to, you can buy a liquid cooling setup and just use another brand of fans.  Such as the Noctua fans I mentioned earlier.  That will make it quiet as a church during a sermon.  Again, though, the price is there as well.  You're paying for what you get.

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Seems like a pretty decent setup.  If I were you, I'd change two things, though.  First, more RAM.  If you're going to be running an Intel machine with a higher end graphics, 8GB of RAM will probably create some form of a bottleneck.  If I were you, I'd upgrade to two 8GB sticks so you can have 16GB and have a little more freedom for you computer.  

 

Second, since you're already spending about a thousand bucks, I recommend shelling out just a smidge more for a SSD to store your OS on, if at all possible.  Even just a 64GB SSD should be enough for your OS, and your computer will boot up faster than you could pull out your phone to check a text message.

 

Other than that, that seems like a pretty solid build.  Granted, if I had the choice, I'd throw in some aftermarket cooling, but that's just me.  You can't really overclock it with stock cooling, but you seem to have a decent enough setup where you really shouldn't need to overclock.  I can run Bioshock Infinite with only a few settings turned down to high at 60 FPS with my 660, so you should be fine.

 

Also, what OS are you installing, anyway?  I noticed that isn't on the order.

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I have Windows 7 on my laptop, and I was told I could put it on a flash drive or something and install it on my PC. If I can't, I'll still probably get Windows 7... or learn how to Linux...

 

Also I don't plan on doing overclocking stuff since I don't fully understand it, and I'm not too concerned about being able to load my OS faster (but if I decide I want it, I'm willing to spend a little extra on it). Same with the RAM, my friend said I'd be fine at 8GB but I'm willing to upgrade if necessary. Thanks for checking it out!

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Wish I could afford this kind of equipment. I use an old Windows XP PC that's now running Windows 7 with 2048mb RAM (Or 2 gigabytes)

But at least I can still run my stuff on it :/

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Wish I could afford this kind of equipment. I use an old Windows XP PC that's now running Windows 7 with 2048mb RAM (Or 2 gigabytes)

But at least I can still run my stuff on it :/

A time will come when you have the money to build a decent gaming rig, I'll bet. You just gotta' be patient and save up those pennies.  ;-)

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Wish I could afford this kind of equipment. I use an old Windows XP PC that's now running Windows 7 with 2048mb RAM (Or 2 gigabytes)

But at least I can still run my stuff on it :/

Oh yeah.

Start saving up.

 

That or you continually buy your hardware over time instead of a $1000 purchase all at once.

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Buying hardware without being able to test it is always a gamble that I'm never willing to make.  I'll buy the easy stuff first, but things like graphics cards, motherboards and CPUs, I have to be able to test them right when I get them, lest I find out later that they're faulty and it's past the RMA period.

 

I forgot about this thread entirely, but I should mention I haven't done too much with my computer since I built it.  I got a new fan in anticipation of doing a complete overhaul to Intel, but that never really ended up happening.  It's just too expensive now, and I have bills to pay.  I do intend on getting aftermarket cooling still, as I still have not done that.  That was the main reason I got the new case, because I wanted a really nice Noctua air cooler for my CPU, but my old case was nowhere near wide enough, so I ended up getting a wider case to accommodate it when I do eventually buy it.

 

My PC is starting to become a little outdated, sadly, and I am pretty sure I'll have to upgrade parts in another year or so, at which point I'll switch to Intel, but until then, mine is running just fine.

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I haven't been able to use my PC for a while because I was away at college, but man is it good to be using it again.

 

I feel it's worth sharing that I bought a Surface Pro 3 for school, and for those who are curious, I think it's a pretty incredible computer for what it does. It can run a lot of programs pretty well; I was using some rather heavy-duty modelling software for school (Maya 2015, AutoCAD) and it was handling them nicely. It can also play a good amount of games at decent quality; I didn't have many games installed because I needed the memory (128 GB) for my homework and stuff, but I was able to run simple games like Hotline Miami at decent settings and have them run flawlessly. I remember playing GMod and Awesomenauts on it at one point and I was able to play those smoothly as well. Those games won't do fantastic on max settings, but they usually run well on average settings and the Surface Pro isn't even built for gaming. (Worth noting that the one I bought has an i5 CPU and 4GB of RAM, although there's a more-expensive version with an i7 processor). The pen it comes with is really good too; I highly recommend buying the keyboard for it though just because it's a nightmare having to navigate the internet without it and obviously a lot of programs need a keyboard and mouse to function. It came loaded with Windows 8 and I wouldn't have it any other way; Windows 8 feels great on it.

 

Just thought I'd share since I've had plenty of people ask me how I like it since school started. I'm definitely not one to suck up to Microsoft but I actually really like this thing.

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Buying hardware without being able to test it is always a gamble that I'm never willing to make.  I'll buy the easy stuff first, but things like graphics cards, motherboards and CPUs, I have to be able to test them right when I get them, lest I find out later that they're faulty and it's past the RMA period.

 

I forgot about this thread entirely, but I should mention I haven't done too much with my computer since I built it.  I got a new fan in anticipation of doing a complete overhaul to Intel, but that never really ended up happening.  It's just too expensive now, and I have bills to pay.  I do intend on getting aftermarket cooling still, as I still have not done that.  That was the main reason I got the new case, because I wanted a really nice Noctua air cooler for my CPU, but my old case was nowhere near wide enough, so I ended up getting a wider case to accommodate it when I do eventually buy it.

 

My PC is starting to become a little outdated, sadly, and I am pretty sure I'll have to upgrade parts in another year or so, at which point I'll switch to Intel, but until then, mine is running just fine.

Sounds like my experience with my PC. I had mine built about 5 or 6 years back now, and I'm at the stage where hardware is starting to die and I have to keep replacing stuff to keep the thing running (let alone upgrade it). So far I've replaced the PSU, RAM & graphics card. I also had to re-apply the thermal paste on the CPU because the old one had pretty much turned to dust. I then had to replace that after I installed my aftermarket cooler. I regret not buying and installing that first, as it probably would have meant my old graphics card hadn't overheated and died. Usually, even budget aftermarket coolers are much much better than stock ones, so even a small investment can improve performance.

 

I think over the next couple years I'll have to get another PC built from scratch though. Not only can this one not keep up anymore, it's getting expensive to keep replacing parts on it. It might just be cheaper to buy an all new PC. I'll miss this old thing, though.  :-)

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My computer is from like 2007. It is pre built and absolutely sucks :P. It has intel core 2 duo, and intergrated graphics at 2.66 GHZ.

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I just wanted to ask something, and if the answer is in one of the previous posts, I'm sorry that I'm too lazy to read.

 

Anyways, I just couldn't stop thinking about how Civ 5 was working on my laptop for the first 30 minutes, then it crashed. I can run games like Freedom Planet, Five Nights at Freddy's, or The Binding of Issac: Rebirth flawlessly, but it lags on I Am Bread, Outlast, and Sonic Generations. I'm thinking the reasoning behind it may lie in my PC's specs, but I don't really know where to go to check it. Does anyone know how to check PC specs? I'm using a Windows 7 laptop in case anyone was curious.

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The main things that contribute to games running well on a PC are your CPU, graphics card, and RAM.  You can find these easily on your computer.  CPU and graphics card are found here:

 

Start Menu -> Control Panel -> Hardware and Sound -> Device Manager

 

Your graphics card is under display adapters and you CPU will be under processors.

 

The RAM is found in a different location found here:

 

Start Menu -> Control Panel -> System and Security -> System

 

There should be a spot that says Installed Memory (RAM).  The amount of GB being your total RAM in your system.

 

If you post what all of those say, I might be able to give you a good judge of what kind of system you have running, but in general, most laptops don't have very good specifications, as they are not usually designed for hardcore gaming of any kind.

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I just wanted to ask something, and if the answer is in one of the previous posts, I'm sorry that I'm too lazy to read.

 

Anyways, I just couldn't stop thinking about how Civ 5 was working on my laptop for the first 30 minutes, then it crashed. I can run games like Freedom Planet, Five Nights at Freddy's, or The Binding of Issac: Rebirth flawlessly, but it lags on I Am Bread, Outlast, and Sonic Generations. I'm thinking the reasoning behind it may lie in my PC's specs, but I don't really know where to go to check it. Does anyone know how to check PC specs? I'm using a Windows 7 laptop in case anyone was curious.

Well there's your problem

 

I was never able to run games very well on my old Windows 7 laptop either; I remember playing Civ 5 with friends, having to turn all of the settings down to the bare minimum, and still having to deal with lag. Games like Rebirth and Freedom Planet can run fine because they're not as heavy to run as games like Civ and online shooters and such. If you want to play stuff like Skyrim or Civ 5 in beautiful HD, or even just be able to play them smoothly without worrying about the game crashing, you'll need to upgrade your hardware.

 

First things first though: if you're curious about your computer's specs, a good way to check your CPU, RAM, and other information is to open Windows Explorer, click on the "Computer" tab at the very top-left of the window, and go to "System Properties". (I'm using Windows 8 but it's probably the same for Windows 7... I think). Never mind, just do what James said

Laptops will never have very good specs unless they're built for gaming (in which case they're horrendously overpriced), and unfortunately there's nothing you can really do to change the parts inside of your laptop.

 

Hate to say it, but the only sure solution to playing games the way you want to be able to is to simply invest a desktop computer. With a desktop PC, you can customize the parts you want and make your computer as powerful as your budget allows. Unfortunately, PCs are quite expensive. The one I currently use cost me about $1000 with Cyber Monday deals, but it's far more powerful than anything I would ever realistically need. You can still build a great gaming computer for as low as $600 and it'll be able to handle plenty of games at fairly decent settings, or if you just want to be able to play games like Civ 5 without them crashing, you can go even lower in price and not worry about the HD graphics and other embellishments. Overall I think it's a very smart option if you have the money for it, and a desktop computer can last you for years, so it's an investment you won't have to renew for quite a while. It's definitely something you'd need to spend time planning out though. I'm sure that several of us here (myself included) would be happy to help you pick out the best parts for your budget.

 

If you want advice on how to get the most out of the laptop you currently have though, I'd be happy to give some pointers on settings you can adjust to help the game run better (assuming you haven't tried that already; I wouldn't be surprised if you did and the games still wouldn't run).

Edited by GoldenGhost
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The main things that contribute to games running well on a PC are your CPU, graphics card, and RAM.  You can find these easily on your computer.  CPU and graphics card are found here:

 

Start Menu -> Control Panel -> Hardware and Sound -> Device Manager

 

Your graphics card is under display adapters and you CPU will be under processors.

 

The RAM is found in a different location found here:

 

Start Menu -> Control Panel -> System and Security -> System

 

There should be a spot that says Installed Memory (RAM).  The amount of GB being your total RAM in your system.

 

If you post what all of those say, I might be able to give you a good judge of what kind of system you have running, but in general, most laptops don't have very good specifications, as they are not usually designed for hardcore gaming of any kind.

So for graphics, it says Intel HD Graphics Family, CPU is Intel Core i5-2450M CPU @ 2.50GHz (it displays that 4 times), and my RAM is 4.00 GB.

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The main things that contribute to games running well on a PC are your CPU, graphics card, and RAM.  You can find these easily on your computer.  CPU and graphics card are found here:

 

Start Menu -> Control Panel -> Hardware and Sound -> Device Manager

 

Your graphics card is under display adapters and you CPU will be under processors.

 

The RAM is found in a different location found here:

 

Start Menu -> Control Panel -> System and Security -> System

 

There should be a spot that says Installed Memory (RAM).  The amount of GB being your total RAM in your system.

 

If you post what all of those say, I might be able to give you a good judge of what kind of system you have running, but in general, most laptops don't have very good specifications, as they are not usually designed for hardcore gaming of any kind.

So for graphics, it says Intel HD Graphics Family, CPU is Intel Core i5-2450M CPU @ 2.50GHz (it displays that 4 times), and my RAM is 4.00 GB.

 

That means you're running an i5 quad-core CPU running at 2.5GHz.  Graphics are integrated (which means that your CPU is also acting as your graphics card), and you have 4GB of RAM, more than likely clocked pretty low.  Typical laptop specs, and definitely the cause of your problems.  Biggest problem being that games that require more power are putting a huge strain on your CPU, since it's trying to run the game and provide the graphics for it, which would lead to freezes and crashes pretty often.

 

There's really nothing you can do about any of it, but that's my analysis of your laptop.

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That means you're running an i5 quad-core CPU running at 2.5GHz.  Graphics are integrated (which means that your CPU is also acting as your graphics card), and you have 4GB of RAM, more than likely clocked pretty low.  Typical laptop specs, and definitely the cause of your problems.  Biggest problem being that games that require more power are putting a huge strain on your CPU, since it's trying to run the game and provide the graphics for it, which would lead to freezes and crashes pretty often.

 

There's really nothing you can do about any of it, but that's my analysis of your laptop.

I really did not want to invest in a desktop, but it looks like I have no choice now. Which one do you think is a good PC for running games like Civ 5, Outlast, or I Am Bread, but not the huge shooter games as I think they are overrated?

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That means you're running an i5 quad-core CPU running at 2.5GHz.  Graphics are integrated (which means that your CPU is also acting as your graphics card), and you have 4GB of RAM, more than likely clocked pretty low.  Typical laptop specs, and definitely the cause of your problems.  Biggest problem being that games that require more power are putting a huge strain on your CPU, since it's trying to run the game and provide the graphics for it, which would lead to freezes and crashes pretty often.

 

There's really nothing you can do about any of it, but that's my analysis of your laptop.

I really did not want to invest in a desktop, but it looks like I have no choice now. Which one do you think is a good PC for running games like Civ 5, Outlast, or I Am Bread, but not the huge shooter games as I think they are overrated?

 

I can't really help you in that aspect, as I am a firm believer in building your own computer.  I have never bought a pre-built desktop computer before in my life, so I'm not really helpful.  My mom has bought computers in the past, but nothing to write home about, heck, given the age, they're probably worse than your laptop.  You won't find a decent computer for cheaper than like five-hundred, though, and even that's cutting it pretty close.

 

HP makes pretty decent stuff, though, from what I hear, so maybe look into one of those?  All I know is my experiences with Dell haven't been anything fantastic.  

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There's really nothing you can do about any of it, but that's my analysis of your laptop.

 Graphics are integrated (which means that your CPU is also acting as your graphics card), and you have 4GB of RAM, more than likely clocked pretty low.  Typical laptop specs, and definitely the cause of your problems.  Biggest problem being that games that require more power are putting a huge strain on your CPU, since it's trying to run the game and provide the graphics for it, which would lead to freezes and crashes pretty often.

I really did not want to invest in a desktop, but it looks like I have no choice now. Which one do you think is a good PC for running games like Civ 5, Outlast, or I Am Bread, but not the huge shooter games as I think they are overrated?

Gamefemale the one thing you must realize about desktop gaming is that you have to be willing to get down and dirty with building your own gaming PC, lest you become ripped off.

 

You'll need to learn what hardware's compatible with what, and exactly how much power you'll need. There are videos that go over this.

 

Having said that, generally speaking you'll want to prioritize buying a better GPU vs a CPU. Having more ram is good, though you have to think about your practical limits. It's doubtful that you'd need 32 gigs of ram, so you might go 16gb minimum.

 

Now as for the actual assembly part (the labor), there are plenty of videos that explain exactly how to safely secure your parts in your case.

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